Description of the fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio “The Last Vessel”

Description of the fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio “The Last Vessel”

Description of the fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio The Last Vessel

The fresco “The Last Supper” was created by Domenico Ghirlandaio in 1480. The artist decorated its wall in the Onyssanti Refectory Church in Florence.

He is one of the greatest Florentine artists of Quattrocento.

His version of The Last Vesper also depicts the last meal of Jesus and his disciples, but in a different iconographic version. The artist changed the poses of the apostles, changed the color scheme and drawing of some details.

He depicted a large P-shaped table. Eleven disciples of Christ are sitting along the walls behind him, and Jesus himself is sitting on the other side in the very center opposite them.

It took place on Great Thursday, on which Christ blessed them.

Domenico made an appearance from the window arches – a light and gentle landscape with the tops of various tree species and birds soaring in the evening sky.

The crimson ceiling of the Refectory is set off by light brown tones of the walls and floor.

The walls are plain color without ornament, the floors are tiled. The drawing is practically impossible to disassemble, but the distinction between squares is clearly visible.

The space of the table itself Ghirlandajo organized, paying particular attention to its decoration. He carefully prescribed all the attributes of the meal, inspired by the features of the new technology for him.

He also plays a large role in light and shade on the surfaces and clothing of the apostles.

In the same technique, the artist gave detailed embroidery framing a tablecloth, a carved bench, a bouquet of flowers in a light vase, a chased gilded dish on one side and jugs of dark material on the floor on the other.

The artist depicted the entire decoration of the table as a typical Florentine version for that time.

To this day, the Secret Vespers fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio continues to decorate the wall of the Refectory between the two courtyards of the Onisanti monastery in the eponymous district of Florence.