Description of the painting by Orest Kiprensky “Poor Lisa”

Description of the painting by Orest Kiprensky “Poor Lisa”

Description of the painting by Orest Kiprensky Poor Lisa

Very interesting portrait of Kiprensky. It was written on the story of Karamzin of the same name. There is also a clear connection with the life of the painter.

The artist was a real psychologist who created magnificent portraits of women. He was able to convey the feminine soul. All his heroines necessarily sad about something, dream. They selflessly love, but at the same time they are completely closed in themselves and never show their feelings.

Before us is a portrait that Kiprensky painted in 1827. Many saw that the artist here showed himself to be a great master here than Karamzin himself. The writer portrays the heroine sentimentally. The artist feels romantic. In the process of working on this canvas, Kiprensky recalled his beloved mother. Her whole life was broken, and love warped.

Kiprensky saw the reasons that have become disastrous for the girl. His mother was the innocent victim of the laws of serfdom.

We see a girl who is sad and sad. She is young and pretty. In the eyes of her plea. She looks at the man, parting with whom she will. In her hands she holds a red flower symbolizing love.

Kiprensky simply could not portray the peasant in a different way. Her feelings don’t matter to anyone. Her love simply has no future. The blame for all was social inequality that prevails in the world. Kiprensky knew that while creating a well-known literary image, he reproached society for this injustice.

His canvas, he causes tears in the souls of those who are compassionate this beautiful girl. The audience enthusiastically accepted only the picturesque power of this portrait. But to the idea of ​​inequality in society, she remained indifferent. Contemporaries preferred simply not to notice this deep thought of the author.

Kiprensky was acutely aware of this misunderstanding and understood that he was alone.


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